Tuesday, July 22, 2014
 
 
By Clip Syndicate
The Government Accountability Office said Tuesday, eleven out of 12 fake applications for government-subsidized health insurance got through a verification process and the bogus beneficiaries are still covered. The GAO launched the sting to check to see how well the Obamacare process checks for counterfeit applications. The results were messy, GAO’s Seto Bagdoyan says in testimony prepared for a hearing Wednesday of the House Ways and Means oversight subcommittee.   [READ MORE]
 

 
 
The Government Accountability Office said Tuesday, eleven out of 12 fake applications for government-subsidized health insurance got through a verification process and the bogus beneficiaries are still covered. The GAO launched the sting to check to see how well the Obamacare process checks for counterfeit applications. The results were messy, GAO’s Seto Bagdoyan says in testimony prepared for a hearing Wednesday of the House Ways and Means oversight subcommittee.   [READ MORE]
 
Over half of Mozambique's trees have been killed by a fast-spreading disease. Many of the country's poorest people relied upon coconuts for their income and food. Concern Worldwide meets with these people and looks at alternatives for replacement cash crops.   [READ MORE]
 
President Barack Obama's health care law is enmeshed in another big legal battle after two federal appeals courts issued contradictory rulings on a key financing issue within hours of each other Tuesday. A divided court panel in Washington called into question the subsidies that help millions of low- and middle-income people pay their premiums, saying financial aid can be paid only in states that have set up their own insurance markets, or exchanges. About 100 miles to the south in Richmond, Virginia, another appeals court panel unanimously came to the opposite conclusion, ruling that the Internal Revenue Service correctly interpreted the will of Congress when it issued regulations allowing consumers in all 50 states to purchase subsidized coverage.

   [READ MORE]
 
Two appeals courts reached differing decisions on Obamacare subsidies Tuesday, meaning a likely Supreme Court case on the key component of the health care law. In the first ruling, the D.C. panel decided the federal money that helped people afford health insurance only could go to those who signed up through exchanges run by states. Only 14 states and the District of Columbia set up their own exchanges, meaning that the 4.7 million who signed up for subsidized health coverage overall under Obamacare through HealthCare.gov could be affected. A few hours later, the 4th Circuit panel came to the opposition conclusion, with all three judges concurring. It said the IRS had the authority to establish the tax credits and that Congress intended them to be a central component of the laws. The opposing rulings mean the next stop for the issue will almost certainly be the nation's highest court in a case that represents the best hopes of the 2010 law's conservative foes to undermine it.

   [READ MORE]
 
Two appeals courts reached differing decisions on Obamacare subsidies Tuesday, meaning a likely Supreme Court case on the key component of the health care law. In the first ruling, the D.C. panel decided the federal money that helped people afford health insurance only could go to those who signed up through exchanges run by states. Only 14 states and the District of Columbia set up their own exchanges, meaning that the 4.7 million who signed up for subsidized health coverage overall under Obamacare through HealthCare.gov could be affected. A few hours later, the 4th Circuit panel came to the opposition conclusion, with all three judges concurring. It said the IRS had the authority to establish the tax credits and that Congress intended them to be a central component of the laws. The opposing rulings mean the next stop for the issue will almost certainly be the nation's highest court in a case that represents the best hopes of the 2010 law's conservative foes to undermine it.

   [READ MORE]
 
President Barack Obama's health care law is enmeshed in another big legal battle after two federal appeals courts issued contradictory rulings on a key financing issue within hours of each other Tuesday. A divided court panel in Washington called into question the subsidies that help millions of low- and middle-income people pay their premiums, saying financial aid can be paid only in states that have set up their own insurance markets, or exchanges. About 100 miles to the south in Richmond, Virginia, another appeals court panel unanimously came to the opposite conclusion, ruling that the Internal Revenue Service correctly interpreted the will of Congress when it issued regulations allowing consumers in all 50 states to purchase subsidized coverage.

   [READ MORE]
 
 
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